StreetDraw24 Exhibition | Not One Place

NOT ONE PLACE | REPORTAGE DRAWING EXHIBITION

Students of Falmouth’s BA(Hons) Illustration have designed and organised an exhibition at The Poly, Falmouth, to share work created by students and staff during their 24-hour drawing event on the streets of Falmouth in August, #streetdraw24, an event which aimed to raise awareness of street homelessness.

The Poly have generously provided their upstairs gallery free of charge for the two week exhibition, in support of the #streetdraw24 team’s aim of raising funds for St. Petroc’s Society, which undertakes valuable work with the street homeless.

Alongside the drawings created, the exhibition will feature an eerie soundscape created by second year BA(Hons) Film student Aaron Mason. Also featured are quotes from those who know what it’s like to live on the street. The exhibition reminds us that many different lives are lived in one town and that the street becomes another place when you have no home to go to.

The exhibition will be fascinating for anyone interested in day-to-day life in Falmouth, in the arts or in the social challenges facing this county. It also raises the question – what can art and artists do to help make the world a better place?

During the exhibition there will be opportunities to learn about the work of  St Petroc’s Society, a Truro-based organisation providing accommodation, support, advice, training and resettlement services to single homeless people in Cornwall. Funds will be raised for St Petroc’s through Donate& Draw – donate what you can afford and enter a draw to win a signed drawing by one of the #StreetDraw24 artists.

Student Helen Trevaskis was among the organisers of StreetDraw24. So far, over £700 has been raised through donationsHelen shared the learning from the 24-hour drawing event in a blog post back in August, and you can hear her talking to SourceFM the day after the event (Helen is introduced at 12:50)

Not One Place opens at the Poly Tuesday 2nd October, with a Private View open to all from 5:15-7:15. 

The exhibition runs until Saturday 13 October, Tuesday-Saturday 10am-5pm.

Linda Scott: Illustration research and my teaching practice

Linda Scott, Senior Lecturer on BA(Hons) Illustration, has recently returned from Northern Portugal, where for the fourth year running she has had a paper accepted by CONFIA, an Illustration and Animation Conference hosted by the University IPCA. Here she talks about the importance of her continued research in Illustration to her teaching of Falmouth’s undergraduates.

‘CONFIA is unique in being one of the few conferences of its kind dedicated to the subject area of illustration. The range of themes within the broader subject, however, is eclectic, and researchers present topics that range from social, political and cultural themes to the more technical and methodological aspects of illustration and animation.

The research I have undertaken over recent years has been fundamental in deepening my appreciation of and understanding of the important role illustration has in the communication and dissemination of challenging themes. Participating in international conferences has exposed me to a range of perspectives and Illustration practices previously unconsidered and the knowledge acquired is invaluable within my teaching practice, which covers both studio based teaching and theoretical dissertation supervision. Sharing my evolving knowledge of the subject with students has lead to stimulating conversations and often reciprocal sharing of books about challenging themes, which currently is an area many students are reflecting upon.

My own research pathway is currently driven by political, ethical, environmental and philosophical analyses of illustration, from historical and current perspectives. In particular I have explored the role that illustration and arts activism might play within the field of bird conservation. My starting point for that was a trip I made to the hunting grounds of Malta with a group of artists, illustrators, musicians and film makers headed by documentary maker Ceri Levy; I had previously participated in a group exhibition collective known as ‘Ghosts Of Gone Birds‘, which showed its first exhibition in the Rochelle Gallery in London.

In recent years, I have been drawn time and again to uses of Illustration as a vehicle for powerfully communicating challenging themes. My presentations at CONFIA over the past four years have included themes embracing climate change, the use of illustrated picture books to teach philosophy and critical thinking skills to primary aged children and in July 2018, my presentation focused on the challenging themes of Colonialism and Imperialism within illustrated books, as viewed through a ‘post colonial‘ lens.

In November 2017 I travelled to Nancy, France to make a presentation at ‘Illustrating Identyties‘, a conference hosted by the University and conceived of with founding members of The Journal Of Illustration, an important peer reviewed publication. The theme of this presentation was about challenging themes within children’s picture books and included subjects such as death, domestic violence, feminism and environmentalism.

My own exploration of the importance of the role Illustration plays in illuminating challenging concepts, ensures I can encourage my students to continue to deepen their own relationship to the practice of illustration and the understanding that it can be a powerful tool for social , political and cultural change’.

 

#StreetDraw24: What can you do in 24 hours?

BA(Hons) Illustration student Helen Trevaskis was among the organisers of StreetDraw24, a drawing initiative to raise awareness and money for homeless charity St. Petroc’s. So far, over £500 has been raised through donations. You can hear Helen talking to SourceFM the day after the event (Helen is introduced at 12:50)

Following the pilot event, Helen shares 24 things that this reportage fundraiser taught her and her fellow drawers about life in Falmouth, about staying up drawing for 24 hours, and about trying to do something good in the world through art.

  1. A town is not one place. Using Falmouth as a reportage location across 24 hours showed us other sides of the town we live in…From the early morning workers busy while most of us are tucked up in bed, to the fitness fanatics using Jacob’s Ladder as their personal gym, to the late night car racers partying at Pendennis Point – the town has many sides.
  2. Not sleeping sends you a bit weird. During the 24 hours some drawers went from being intensely focused to barely able to speak – let alone draw – to practically hysterical with laughter at the smallest thing, or continually hungry. Fascinating what sleep deprivation does to you!
  3. Make it fun. Along the long walk from The Moor to Falmouth Cemetery via Pendennis, we played drawing games to get our energy up as midnight came and went. The results were not artistic masterpieces (or even a record of where we were, given we could barely see) but were one of the most memorable bits of the night.
  4. Stay safe. Even though we live in a safe town, we ensured no one drew alone at night, and we kept touch with each other via a Messenger group.
  5. Talk to people. During the 24 hours many interesting interactions occurred. One group, drawing on a housing estate, talked to an elderly couple who then fed them fruit. Another got #StreetDraw24 followed on Instagram by a creative agency in London after chatting to its founder. Many more revealed how many people are themselves artists in this town. Embrace such interactions – it’s one of the joys of location drawing.
  6. Start. Many of us were not sure what to draw when we first got out on the street despite lots of great advice from reportage supremo Anna Cattermole’s blog, written for us in the run up to #StreetDraw24 (sorry Anna!). While it can be good to have a plan perhaps what’s more important is getting going, because once you do, drawing tends to have its own momentum.
  7. Mix it up. Bringing variety into how you draw not just what you draw can help give you and your work energy, particularly as the hours tick by.
  8. Be respectful. There was a point at about 1am Friday where five of us were drawing a camper van parked at Gyllygvase Beach, and realised someone was probably asleep inside! As we quietly snuck off, we imagined how weird it would have been for the occupants to find us all there, reminding us it’s important to be respectful in choosing our locations.
  9. Keep repeating your message. #Streetdraw24 is designed to raise awareness about the problem of street homelessness in Cornwall, but it’s very easy for people to miss the point. So don’t be shy about repeating the why of what you’re doing, to get it across effectively, and then repeating it again.
  10. Make it social. While drawing in pairs or a group is not something illustrators and artists normally do, even the least extrovert among us got lots out of drawing on location together.
  11. Dogs are of the day cats of the night. This is just true.
  12. Keep going. Whether you’re on location for four hours or 12 or 24, you’re not going to be in the mood the whole time and not everything you produce will be great; but we definitely saw work evolve across the 24 hours, because we just kept going.
  13. Be shamelessly opportunist. Telling everyone you meet what you’re up to before, during and after an event like this is really valuable. Not just because they might want to get involved, but also because the story of what you’re doing is almost as important as the thing itself, and the more you tell it the better it will get.
  14. Drawing from observation matters. If you’re involved in the arts, you should draw, because drawing is less about drawings and more about looking at, engaging with and absorbing what’s around you – a core artistic skill.
  15. Collaboration is an important creative skill. This time around there were only a few people from beyond the BA Illustration course involved in StreetDraw24. It’s something we’ll shake up next time, because collaborating brings new ideas, perspectives and opportunities.
  16. Wet wipes are your friend. Whether you’re using messy charcoal, find there are no open public toilets near where you’re drawing, or you’ve taken food to eat and are worried about where your hands have been; you’re going to need wet wipes during an event like this.
  17. Be easy-going. This was a pilot, so for us it was important to have as few rules as possible, so people could invent what worked for them and we could learn.
  18. Most people are really nice. They are. So talk to them.
  19. Getting the money bit right is hard. #StreetDraw24 was designed as a fundraiser and fundraising is difficult but an event idea isn’t a good one if it doesn’t make money.
  20. “The more you look the more you see”. So true.
  21. Laughing helps warms you up. Also true but you still need a coat, thick socks and a hat if you’re out all night.
  22. There are lots of ways to take part. While a small band of drawers took to the streets last week, many other people sent messages of support, donated to St Petroc’s, and ‘liked’ or commented on the images we posted. To us they were all part of the #StreetDraw24 team.
  23. Feel lucky. There are many things those of us with homes to go to each night take for granted – like having a toilet when and where you want one. It’s important to remember this is not everyone’s reality and to remember how lucky we are.
  24. Be ambitious. Next up will be an exhibition of #StreetDraw24 work – exhibition space kindly donated by the Poly– in early October. But we’ve bigger plans, too, so watch this space…

You can donate to the StreetDraw24 fundraising page, in aid of St. Petroc’s, and you can see more of the resulting work, and hear about future initiatives via the StreetDraw24 Facebook page.

StreetDraw24: Raising awareness of homelessness in Cornwall.

For 24 hours starting at noon on 23 August, a small band of students and other locals will be drawing from the streets of Falmouth to raise awareness of Cornwall’s homelessness problem, as part of the first ever StreetDraw24. Here, one of the organisers, BA(Hons) Illustration student Helen Trevaskis, talks about the motivation and intention for the initiative… 

StreetDraw24: How can art be a force for good?

‘While beyond the Tamar, Cornwall may conjure up thoughts of pasties and clotted cream, happy childhood holidays and Poldark’s semi-clad antics on horseback along a never-ending coastline, anyone who spends proper time here knows that parts of the county face many and serious social problems. One of these is homelessness, with some reports highlighting an increase of 52% in rough sleeping in the county between 2009 and 2016. While the arts may not seem an obvious place to look to for ways to bring focus onto this problem, that’s exactly what StreetDraw24 wants to do.

How? Well, the idea is simple. Over a 24 hour period, ending at noon on the 24th of the month, draw from the streets of your town, post images to social media using the tag #streetdraw24 and share a link for donations to a relevant homelessness charity. After the event, use the best 24 images – one for each hour of the day – to promote the issue of homelessness and fundraise further. Then…learn, grow, repeat!

This will be the first ever StreetDraw24 and has been organised by first year students from Falmouth’s BA(Hons) Illustration keen to feel connected to and active in the community they now live in. With an emphasis on learning by doing on a small scale, they’ve been promoting the event on Facebook and raising funds for St Petroc’s Society – a Truro based charity supporting the single homeless. Along the way advice on location based drawing, ‘reportage’, has been shared from Falmouth students and tutors alongside information on Cornwall’s homelessness problem.

Some of those taking part in the event will draw from the streets for the whole 24 hours to bring attention to the sad reality that for some the streets are their home 24/7. So, if you see a damp cold looking person drawing from the streets of Falmouth at the end of next week go and talk to them – they’ll love to share what they’re doing! Or even better – take part by checking out the StreetDraw24 Facebook page, donating to St Petroc’s Society or offering ideas for how to make the impact of this initiative even bigger’.

 

SCOOP: 3rd Year BA(Hons) Illustration Students Published !

Four 3rd year BA(Hons) Illustration students – Lucy Rivers, Katherine Harris, Jasper Golding and Sam Hinton – have had their work published in SCOOP magazine, ‘The Human Body’ issue.

The students made an industry visit to London in April 2018 and the industry connection was made with Luana Asiata, Creative Director & Designer of SCOOP magazine. All the illustrations were then completed whilst studying at the Falmouth School of Art .

Scoop is a magazine aimed at 7 to 12 year olds that publishes all forms of story, told by the most fantastic authors and illustrators and designed to inspire and nurture a love of reading. William Boyd in The Guardian called the magazine ‘A transforming experience.’

 

Falmouth Illustrators Create Mural for Penryn Primary Academy

Second year BA(Hons) Illustration students Elleanna Bird, Sophie Freestone and Amelia Brooks recently completed  work on a mural to transform some of the interior space at Penryn Primary Academy.

The project, carried out at the school over three weeks, was a voluntary commission, enthusiastically taken up by the three friends. Elleanna commented, “We were all very keen to get started and we had lots of ideas to share. Our ideas encouraged the Head Teacher, who seemed very pleased and excited about what we had planned”. Elleanna says she feels grateful to have been involved, describing an atmosphere of encouragement and motivation; she feels that their enthusiasm in creating the work was kept high by the positive reactions of members of the school community who popped in to see how the project was coming along.

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Sophie reflects on the process of creating the pieces: “The three of us were working together on one painting, which meant all of our bizarre and strange ideas were multiplied by three! The murals happened in quite an organic way; although we had developed plans to work from, a lot of the visual elements came to life in the moment when we were drawing and painting straight onto the boards”.

Elleanna, Sophie and Amelia with Penryn Primary Academy Head Teacher James Hitchens, at the unveiling of the mural panels.

The result is a feast for the eyes – a vibrant panorama depicting creatures of land and sea, as well as Cornish motifs and legends. Sophie says, “I really enjoyed this project because of the unlimited amounts of colour and creativity we were permitted to use. In the paintings, if you look hard enough, you can spot a sea monster, a sloth playing the drums, a pair of feet belonging to a giant and a couple of dinosaurs wearing high heels!”.

The murals received a fantastic response from pupils when unveiled by the artists at a school assembly. Of the experience, Sophie said, “We had a fantastic few weeks painting the murals, and I would recommend anyone who gets the opportunity to get involved in a project such as this – local or afar – to say yes!”.

BA(Hons) Illustration Course Coordinators Natalie Hayes and Keryn Bibby have since met with Head Teacher James Hitchens and Assistant Head Chris Lee, to discuss possible future projects. They were shown around the school and discussed opportunities to involve Illustration students; from the possibility of murals for the walls of the swimming pool, production of inspirational imagery to enliven library spaces, or Illustration students working with Penryn Primary pupils on a series of creative workshops. Natalie commented, “Developing the bonds between Falmouth’s Illustration course and Penryn Primary Academy will provide our students with further excellent professional practice opportunities, and we hope will enhance the school experience for the primary pupils”.

New York Commission for 3rd year Illustrator

Securing multiple appointments with editorial giants such as The New York Times and Wall Street Journal is one thing. Receiving commissions from such renowned companies whilst still a student, immediately after showcasing your work to the directors, is quite another.

After a hectic day in New York pitching portfolios to art directors from a broad range of companies, Illustration students prepared to wind down for the evening. But one student, Tom Paterson, secured an opportunity that could be the first step into a successful editorial career.

On the strength of his portfolio presentation, Tom was offered the chance to create an illustration for a New York Times online article, the deadline for which was the next day.

Tom explained: “The article I was sent had a lot of great imagery. When creating editorial illustrations, I always tend to lean towards conceptual illustrations rather than literal interpretations of the text, as the image has to speak on its own but also must reflect the core ideas of the text.”

The piece, entitled ‘The Soul-Crushing Student Essay’, explores the dissolution of university students’ ability to write in a subjective format, the private “I”. On his creation, Tom reflected: “I had a few ideas in mind, most of which pictured the student chiselling themselves out of a block of paper. The final illustration has a more refined version of this concept, as the essay the student writes is being stacked into a shape resembling their head.”

Our undergraduate illustrators have the opportunity in their third year to attend the New York agencies study visit; after returning home, Tom was notified of another exciting prospect requiring his particular skills. The Wall Street Journal needed an illustration for their upcoming Off-Duty summer issue. He said: “In the space of three weeks I’ve worked for two of my favourite publications. I’m going to be constantly networking with more art directors and sending work out to potential clients.

“I can’t emphasise enough how well the tutors on the course have prepared us all for the real world of illustration. I’ve also found that the focus on conceptual thinking and strategies has changed the way I think about creating images. I now spend 70% of the time sketching and generating ideas, instead of focusing all my time on just creating a pretty picture.”

BA(Hons) Illustration Collaborative Project in Bristol

BA(Hons) Illustration Senior Lecturers Linda Scott and Natalie Hayes recently accompanied a group of second and third year students to Bristol, for a week-long trip focused on studio visits, professional practice talks and workshops, as well as an exhibition of work produced by them during their visit in response to a brief.

Dave Bain talking about his projects

Falmouth Alumni Dave Bain, who graduated in 2006, as established himself in Bristol as a lynchpin of the thriving Illustration scene. As well as being a successful Illustrator, Dave is responsible for setting up illustration studios in Hamilton House (in the Stokes Croft area of the city) and the Illustration Collective, ‘Drawn In Bristol‘.

A good number of Falmouth Illustration alumni have relocated to Bristol, as an alternative to London; many have studio space in Hamilton House, which Dave modeled on the Falmouth course’s studio set up. Our students were given a tour of Hamilton House, and also The Island, a converted police station on Nelson Street.

At Hamilton House, Illustrators Lara Hawthorne, Paula Bowles, Freya Hartas and others talked informally about their experiences as Illustrators since graduating; at The Island, collective Sad Ghost Club talked about collaboration, the merchandise they produce and what brought them together as a group.

Coordinating the visit for us, Dave Bain booked The Square Club as a meeting space for us, and as venue for speakers Lara Hawthorne, Joe Roberts and Laurie Stansfield, who are working together and have developed a mentoring scheme suitable for graduates who are unable to work in studio spaces and who might otherwise be subject to isolation. Joe and Laurie meet monthly to support one another with projects and business, holding one another accountable for developing projects and setting schedules. Dave talked about his experience setting up the studios and working collaboratively, and spoke about his role as a ‘connector’ of people, bringing them together to develop public realm projects which directly benefit the local community.

Before their trip, students had been given a brief, focusing on themes of Regeneration and Collaboration. The culmination of their research was the formulation of visual outputs for exhibition in the Space Gallery, in the Old Market area of Bristol. Student exhibits ranged from 3D objects to customised shirts, a video and a 3D mobile.

Limbic Cinema workshop

A private view of the exhibition followed a final day of workshops, from Tom Newell of Limbic Cinema. Tom digitised drawings from students’ sketchbooks and mapped and projected these onto plinths and walls; he taught students how to do the same, with the outcome being several visual collages projected onto 2D and 3D spaces.

We commend our students for their high level of engagement throughout this intensive professional practice study visit, and for their participation even when treacherous weather threatened to impact heavily their activities.

 

Coming Soon…Falmouth School of Art Degree Shows

The studios are cleared, third years have moved in with paint, tools and the labours of their final year and are already transforming the spaces into what promises to be a diverse and vibrant degree show from Falmouth School of Art this year.

Students of BA(Hons) Drawing, BA(Hons) Fine Art and BA(Hons) Illustration will open their shows to the public on Friday 25 May, including a launch that evening, 6-9pm, all welcome. As well as final degree work from our third years, separate exhibitions will showcase work from our first and second year BA(Hons) Illustration and BA(Hons) Drawing students.

The shows will be open as follows:

  • Friday 25 May, 10-4pm
  • Friday 25 May 6-9pm exhibition launch, all welcome
  • Saturday 26 May 10-4pm
  • Sunday 27 May 10-4pm
  • Monday 28 May (bank holiday) 10-4pm
  • Tuesday 29 May 10-4pm
  • Wednesday 30 May 10-4pm

Get the dates in your diaries and we’ll see you in three weeks!

For details of all Falmouth University summer shows, see the website.

Wunderkammer 2018: Hot off the Presses!

This year’s much anticipated edition of Wunderkammer flew off the presses literally a day before both London and New York study trips. This year’s cover has been illustrated by Falmouth Illustration alumna and rising star Ana Jaks.


The standard of work in this year’s book is extremely high, showing the full range of talent that is about to graduate from the BA(Hons) Illustration course here at Falmouth. All staff that have taught the current final year students through the course can, alongside the students, take a share in the high quality of the work published in the book. Particular credit goes to the third year staff for the huge effort that they have made to research, design co-ordinate the production of this book.

Thanks also go out to the alumni who have contributed insightful interviews. These include: Calum Heath, Beth Wheatley, Owen Gent and Hugh Cowling (Uncle Ginger), Jamie Edler, Thomas Pullin.

Here’s a sample of spreads from the book.

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MA Illustration: Authorial practice graduates win Laydeez do Comics Graphic Novel Prizes

The Laydeez do Comics Prize exists to provide “recognition and celebration of the wealth of comics work currently being produced by female-identifying people based in the UK”.

 

Emma Burleigh, a recent graduate of MA Illustration: Authorial Practice has won the first £2K Laydeez do Comics; Women’s Prize for Unpublished Graphic Novels in Progress for her graphic novel My Other Mother, My Other Self .

Emma is an artist and art teacher who is passionate about the vibrant, glowing and mercurial qualities of water-colour and mixed media. ” I’m interested in everyday life, the inner life and the layers of life in between.”  In 2015, she completed an MA in ‘Authorial Illustration’ at Falmouth University, with Distinction and My Other Mother, My Other Self is a development of her MA graphic novel, Birth Mother.

Birth Mother was an exploration in words and painting about her journey … Emma says ” It’s about tracing my birth mother who I traced about ten years ago, and it’s really just the story of how I found her and how our relationship unfolded. It actually becomes more about my relationship with myself.”

Emma was thrilled to be shortlisted for the prize as she has been working on her book for many years.

 

Rebecca Jones, a 2012 graduate also from MA Illustration: Authorial Practice, came fourth.

She said about her entry into the competition… “I’ve been making comics properly for about five years – cat zines that are a little bit fantastical and a bit silly. I’ve been trying to make something new by moving into social issues and doing something that’s a bit more personal. It’s called Boomerang and it’s about an unemployed psychology graduate who’s moved back home after graduation and it’s an exploration of issues around the 2008 recession and the following economic crash. It’s about a rite of passage of a few months of not knowing what to do and what it means to be an adult.”

Falmouth School of Art Drawing Forum 2018

The Falmouth School of Art Drawing Forum 2018 posed the question ‘What Does Drawing Do?

It has been a long established assumption that drawing underpins most disciplines within the creative sector, but what drawing does, and how it functions for different practitioners, is probably an ever-changing and essential component.

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By asking a series of speakers to talk about what drawing does for them, this forum hoped to develop a better understanding of the possibilities and functions of drawing. As well as Falmouth-based researchers, the event welcomed guest speakers of national and international standing, including:

Storyboard Artist Jay Clarke worked on the Oscar-winning Wallace & Gromit & the Curse of the WereRabbit and other projects with Aardman and was lead storyboard artist for The Grand Budapest Hotel, which won Silver Bear at the Berlin Film Festival and the Oscar for Best Production Design. He is currently storyboarding Universal’s The Voyage of Dr Dolittle and creating an illustrated children’s novel.

Multi-disciplinary artist Solveig Settemsdal lives and works in London and Bristol; she won the Jerwood Drawing Prize for her video work Singularity in 2016.

Ed Eva and George Baldwin formed the drawing research partnership eegb after graduating from Falmouth’s BA(Hons) Drawing in 2014. eegb’s practice lies at the intersection of drawing and technology; they build machines that draw, have been awarded a number of residencies and grants and have exhibited in the UK, Ireland, Germany and the USA.

This video shares sections of the eight short talks on how drawing is used in contemporary creative practice:

 

 

 

A BA(Hons) Illustration study visit to snowy Bristol!

Our second and third year BA(Hons) Illustration students recently enjoyed a study visit to snowy Bristol.  The focus of the trip included studio visits to two artist/illustration studios; Hamilton House and The Island.

The students enjoyed tours of both venues, at Hamilton House they met with practicing illustrators including Lara Hawthorne, Paula Bowles and Freya Hartas who spoke with the students about their experiences as illustrators since graduating.  At The Island studios, students met with collective ‘Sad Ghost Club‘, a small team working hard to make comics, apparel and merchandise to spread positive awareness of mental health.

Students also had presentations from Lara Hawthorne, Joe Roberts and Laurie Stansfield, who have been working together to develop a mentoring scheme called ‘CAP’ which involves meeting up regularly to support one another with business, including developing projects and setting schedules.  

Falmouth alumni Dave Bain, who graduated from BA(Hons) Illustration in 2006 coordinated all the activities that students participated in whilst visiting Bristol.  Dave also gave students a presentation about his own experiences since graduating. As well as being a successful illustrator, Dave is responsible for setting up illustration studios in Hamilton House and an illustration collective ‘Drawn In Bristol‘, formed in 2011 which supports and profiles Bristol based illustrators.

Before travelling to Bristol, students were given a brief to work too, focusing on the themes of ‘regeneration and collaboration’ and the culmination of their primary research was to formulate visual outputs which were exhibited in the SPACE (Sound-Performance-Art-Community-Engagement) Gallery.

Prior to the exhibition Private View, Tom Newell of Limbic Cinema, provided workshops with the students; Tom digitized drawings from student’s sketchbooks and mapped and projected these onto plinths and walls – he also taught students how to do the same and the outcome was several visual collages projected onto 2D and 3D spaces.

For the exhibition, students created a range of work in response to the brief, from 3D objects, to customised shirts, a video and a 3D mobile.

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Overland, by Visiting Professor Graham Rawle – in bookstores now!

Overland, the new book from our rather brilliant Visiting Professor of Illustration Graham Rawle, is now out, published by Chatto & Windus.

We can heartily recommend anything by Graham, so if you’re new to his work, you’re in for a treat – Overland is available online from many sellers, or from your local independent bookstore! Scroll down for more… 

 

 

Welcome to Overland! Where the California sun shines down on synthetic grass and plastic oranges bedeck the trees all year round. Steam billows gently from the chimney tops and the blue tarpaulin lake is open for fishing…

Hollywood set-designer George Godfrey has been called on to do his patriotic duty and he doesn’t believe in half-measures. If he is going to hide an American aircraft plant from the threat of Japanese aerial spies he has an almighty job on his hands. He will need an army of props and actors to make the Lockheed factory vanish behind the semblance of a suburban town. Every day, his “Residents” climb through a trapdoor in the factory roof to shift model cars, shop for imaginary groceries and rotate fake sheep in felt-green meadows.

Overland is a beacon for the young women labouring below it: Queenie, dreaming of movie stardom while welding sheet metal; Kay, who must seek refuge from the order to intern “All Persons of Japanese Ancestry”. Meanwhile, George’s right-hand Resident, Jimmy, knows that High Command aren’t at all happy with the camouflage project…

With George so bewitched by his own illusion, might it risk confusing everybody – not just the enemy?
Overland is a book like no other — to be read in landscape format. Based on true events, it is a novel where characters’ dreams and desires come down to earth with more than a bump, confronting the hardships of life during wartime. As surreal and playful as it is affecting and unsettling, no-one other than Graham Rawle could have created it.

FOMO – Introducing Falmouth’s first Art Publishing Fair

F O M O – the first ever Falmouth Art Publishing Fair – opens at 4pm on Friday 29 September for a weekend of talks, workshops, screenings, artists’ book works, performances, zines and comics and readings.   

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Organised by Falmouth School of Art’s Senior Lecturers Neil Chapman, Gillian Wylde and Carolyn Shapiro and Associate Lecturer Maria Christoforidou, F O M O will take place at Falmouth Art Gallery and the Library of the Municipal Buildings, The Moor, Falmouth, and brings together Falmouth School of Art staff and students with local participating institutions including: Falmouth Art Gallery, Falmouth Library, Tate St Ives, Stranger Collective, Urbanomic, Atlantic Press, Burning House Books, BLNT Collective, Keiken and Krowji. 

F O M O will include contributions from academic and research colleagues from: Royal  Holloway University, Cambridge University, West Dean College, Aarhus University, Plymouth University, Goldsmiths University of London, Research Center for Material Culture Netherlands and from across Departments at Falmouth University.

Generously supported by Falmouth Art Gallery, the event has grown out of discussion between colleagues across different departments at Falmouth University. From meetings as a Research Forum, finding common ground between their varied interests, the group started to consider joint research and how best to team up for that work. One of the organisers, Neil Chapman, reflects on the development of the event, and what we can look forward to over the weekend…

‘As a research group, we share a commitment to collective work. That’s both a pragmatic interest and a critical position too. Most often, when people work together it’s so that a workload can be shared. But collective work is unpredictable and inefficient too and these are values that might tend to be lost in the current climate. There is a lot of emphasis in the contemporary workplace on individuals’ success and the competition that results can be destructive. Our title for the event – Fear of Missing Out – is on some level an ironic allusion to these issues.

We are all of us, in different ways, committed to discursive work, to the climate of ideas that surrounds ‘making’ in our different disciplines. And that’s a foundation for the publication fair too, reflected in the many talks, screenings, readings and performances scheduled over the weekend. F O M O provides an opportunity for us to invite our colleagues and friends to Cornwall. It’s good for the cultures of creative practice here in Falmouth. F O M O will bring lots of people into contact who might not have met otherwise. We’re excited to imagine the new partnerships and the new work that might result.

The aim has been to inaugurate the kind of event that we would want to go to ourselves, also the kind of event that students would be excited about. Henrietta Boex, Director of Falmouth Art Gallery, has been extremely supportive. We’ve made all kinds of demands on her and she seems never to say no to anything; the Gallery’s Glyn Winchester has also been a great support. The independence of the project is a way of underscoring our own priorities, which are evident in all kinds of ways through the framing of the event: the name, the graphics, the publicity, the choice of which artists, writers and publishers to invite. There are many Art Publishing Fairs in the UK and abroad and we have had an eye on some of those. But in another sense this Fair has been invented from scratch. And for that reason it will work well as a foundation for bigger and more varied research initiatives to come. We’re talking about a future peer-reviewed journal, discursive gatherings – dream dinner date/fantasy football team type things with exciting living people—maybe some dead folk too, ghosts. No zombies. Digital Roland Barthes’ Camera Lucida . . .

It’s particularly good to be working with current students and recent Falmouth University graduates. As part of FOMO, Graham Taylor who studied Fine Art and who graduated in 2015 is curating an exhibition entitled Practically Outside, involving a dozen or more Falmouth alumni. His contribution makes a direct engagement with the FOMO ethos, looking critically at what it means to be an ‘emerging artist’, engaging in the most thoughtful way with different platforms of exhibition and print publication.’

F O M O also includes contributions from writers, artists, poets, publishers, activists, hackers, Falmouth University alumni and musicians both national and international.

F O M O is an inaugural event, bringing a new art research collective into being, which, over forthcoming months will stage events in different forms and at different locations, connecting diverse networks.

https://falmouthartpublishingfair.wordpress.com/

Illustration students collaborate with local school children to create exciting mural

Lucy Rivers, Sonja Burniston and Iola McCorkindale, BA(Hons) Illustration students at Falmouth were given the opportunity to work with a local School, Truro Learning Academy, to create a mural for their School during the Summer break.

Lucy said of the project “Once we got a small brief from Jon (Thrive Lead – Senior Leader at Truro), we went into the school to work with the children to generate some ideas on Friendship, Trees and Murals…It was such an amazing learning experience and we have made some really fantastic friends over at Truro Learning Academy.

Jon was so generous, on the last day, Iola, Sonja and I were all invited into assembly and we were given flowers and a gift card and all the children sang for us, it was so lovely, hopefully we can work with them again on future projects!”

To find out more about what our Illustration students are up to at Falmouth, head over to the Illustration course blog here

Visiting Professor Graham Rawle to give inaugural lecture at Falmouth

(c) Graham Rawle, from The Wizard of Oz

Author, artist and designer Graham Rawle will give his inaugural lecture as Falmouth School of Art’s Visiting Professor of Illustration on 22 March 2017.

Internationally admired, Rawle is one of the UK’s most interesting and original visual communicators, known by many for his long running ‘Lost Consonants’ strip, which appeared in the Guardian from 1990. A writer and collage artist whose visual work incorporates illustration, design, photography and installation, Rawle has a strong following for his eagerly-awaited published books, which include The Card (shortlisted for the 2013 Writer’s Guild Award), Graham Rawle’s Wonder Book of Fun and Diary of an Amateur Photographer. His collaged novel Woman’s World, created entirely from fragments of found text clipped from vintage women’s magazines won wide critical acclaim, described by The Times as ‘a work of genius…the most wildly original novel produced in this country in the past decade.’ His reinterpretation of The Wizard of Oz won Book of the Year and Best Illustrated Trade Book at the 2009 British Book Design and Production Awards. Alongside these works, Rawle has produced regular series for The Observer, The Sunday Telegraph Magazine and The Times.

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Graham Rawle. Photo credit: Jenny Lewis

Rawle’s flair and passion for education has been recognised through honorary appointments and awards. As a previous contributor to both Falmouth School of Art’s guest speaker programme and its Illustration Forum he already has a strong interest in Illustration here. Of his appointment in 2016, Rawle said, “It’s a great honour for me to have been made Visiting Professor of Illustration at Falmouth University. I have long admired the School of Art’s commitment to nurturing original and individual thinking in art and design. My own research in sequential design and visual narrative spans across illustration, literature and, more recently, film. I’m interested in how the principles of storytelling, particularly three-act structure, can be employed in the development of design strategies across a wide range of disciplines. I look forward to finding ways of making connections with students, staff and researchers at Falmouth”.

Rawle has established himself as a ground-breaking research-led writer, illustrator and designer, evidenced through the range and depth of key scholarly texts that cite and analyse his work. He teaches on the MA Sequential Design/Illustration and MA Arts and Design by Independent Project courses at Brighton and in 2012 he was awarded an honorary doctorate for Services to Design from Norwich University of the Arts.

Graham Rawle’s lecture at our Falmouth Campus is free, but registration is required, as seats are limited: Click here to register through our Eventbrite page.

Find out more about our BA(Hons) Illustration and MA Illustration: Authorial Practice.

 

International awards for Falmouth Illustration alumni

Two of this year’s four winners of the BolognaRagazzi Award are alumni of Falmouth’s BA(Hons) Illustration. The BolognaRagazzi Award is one of the world’s most highly regarded international prizes in children’s publishing, giving winners extraordinary visibility, including through high profile recognition at the Bologna Children’s Book Fair.

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Emma Lewis won the Opera Prima category for The Museum of Me, by Tate Publishing. She said, ‘Winning the award was an amazing surprise, as I hadn’t even considered that I would be put forward. I’m also pleased because it reflects all the brilliant hard work put in by my publishers, Tate’.

2012 graduate William Grill won the Non-fiction category for his book The Wolves of Currumpaw, published by Flying Eye Books. Grill said ‘I am over the moon that Wolves was chosen for this year’s non-fiction category, I had never imagined that it would be so well received overseas. Since my aim was to bring Seton’s tale to a modern audience, I now feel more hopeful that more people will appreciate the story’.

The Wolves of Currumpaw has also been long listed for this year’s CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal, the UK’s oldest award for Children’s literature, previously won by some of the best loved children’s illustrators, including Quentin Blake and Raymond Briggs. Grill won the Medal in 2015 for his acclaimed Shackleton’s Journey.

Alongside Grill on the Kate Greenaway Medal long list is Levi Pinfold, who graduated from Falmouth in 2006. Pinfold – also a previous Medal-winner, in 2013 for Black Dog – has been selected for his picture book Greenling, published by Templar Publishing. The Kate Greenaway Medal short list will be announced on 16 March, with the winners announced at a ceremony in June.

Falmouth Illustration students visit agencies in New York

NY 2016

 

It’s that time of year again – our third year BA(Hons) Illustration students are currently in New York, showing their portfolios. 48 students have a breathtaking schedule of 30 visits underway, including to The New York Times, Penguin Books, Harper Collins and The Wall Street Journal, which has commissioned a number of Falmouth students and graduates in recent years.

To read about the visit, follow the courses’s blog, – https://falmouthillustrationblog.com – where posts are being added throughout the week.

ELLA-STRATED: Lynette Yiadom-Boakye at Falmouth


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In a more informal lecture set up, Falmouth School of Art students were lucky enough to listen to successful alumna, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye in conversation with Dr Ginny Button on Wednesday 9th March 2016. Visual response by BA(Hons) Illustration student, Ella Kasperowicz.

ELLA-STRATED: Lindsay Seers at Falmouth

(C) Ella Kasperowicz

(C) Ella Kasperowicz

Lindsay Seers delivered a unique and engaging lecture on Wednesday 2nd March 2016 inviting Falmouth School of Art students into her creative process. Her use of photography to document, act as evidence and represent reality as well as raw, truthful lecture delivery inspired the accompanying visual; my unedited spontaneous notes during the presentation. Sharing these brings similar feelings of unease that Seers described as an influence in her work.

ELLA-STRATED: Graham Gussin at Falmouth

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(C) Ella Kasperowicz

Unlike Graham Gussin’s, ‘Unseen Film’, the Falmouth School of Art lecture theatre was packed on Wednesday 17th February 2016 as the artist delivered an engaging lecture regarding light and dark, the influence of cinema and how a black triangle is rather terrifying!

Volcano the Bear

One of our BA(Hons) Illustration lecturers, Nick Mott, has another ongoing career in music.  Recently, a group that he co-formed 20 years ago, Volcano The Bear, has had a box set released on the German record label, Miasmah.

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The box set comprises 5 vinyl LPs and a 50 page book of photos and illustrations.  You can listen to a 35 minute mix of 9 of the tracks here.  The box set is also available to borrow in the collection of the Penryn campus library.

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In Leicester, England in May 1995 Aaron Moore, Nick Mott, Clarence Manuelo & Daniel Padden created a free form group named Volcano The Bear out of their frustration with standard musical limitations.  Now, after 20 years of experimenting with improvisation, folk, Dada, Post Punk, Krautrock, noise, surreal comedy, pure avant-garde and more, the group has obtained a cult following and high critical praise across the globe.  Reknowned for their highly theatrical and obscure live performances, as well as their mind-blowing catalogue of releases, VTB truly is a one of a kind group, consistently pushing forward with their own unique, experimental approach to sound making.

Commencing manages to be both a retrospective of the group’s 20 year history as well as it’s own unique release filled with vast amounts of material.  The 5 albums, 64 tracks & over 4 hours in length, has been carefully put together over the last couple of years to become an entity – working as much by itself as well as a whole. Expect an abundance of unreleased material, alt-versions, tracks from early cassette albums never released on vinyl, live recordings, pieces from forgotten compilation appearances and more, all mixed and compiled together to form 5 stand-alone albums.

More information on the release can be found at sonicpieces, and at thewire.

 

ELLA-STRATED: Nashashibi/Skaer at Falmouth

(C) Ella Kasperowicz

(C) Ella Kasperowicz

Rosalind Nashashibi and Lucy Skaer showcased their collaborative film work in an engaging lecture to Falmouth School of Art students on Wednesday 3rd February 2016. Appropriating existing art as a starting point, themes in their projects include power, the portrayal of women and distortion of reality. Visual response by Ella Kasperowicz, BA(Hons) Illustration.

 

BA(Hons) Illustration head to London

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Falmouth’s BA(Hons) Illustration students are currently in London for a series of visits, including: Faber & Faber, Sparks Studio, Human After All, The Guardian, The Telegraph Magazine, Penguin Books, Egmont, Oh Comely Magazine, Walker Books, The Folio Society, The Artworks, Transworld, Nobrow, Tate Publishing and Dorling Kindersley

Students are also looking forward to the course’s annual Illustration Forum, held at The London College of Communication. This year’s speakers are Olivier Kugler, Jonny Hannah and Aude Van Ryn.

Don’t forget to follow the Falmouth Illustration blog, where you can see more pictures from the trip so far and keep up to date with news from the course.

 

ELLA-STRATED: Krijn de Koning at Falmouth

(C) Ella Kasperowicz

(C) Ella Kasperowicz

Krijn de Koning’s playful approach to designing spaces and love of drawing came across brilliantly in his talk to Falmouth students on Wednesday 25th November 2015. Visual response by Ella Kasperowicz, BA(Hons) Illustration.

ELLA-STRATED: Gavin Turk at Falmouth

(C) Ella Kasperowicz

(C) Ella Kasperowicz

Gavin Turk returned to Falmouth University on Wednesday 18th November 2015 to deliver an entertaining lecture on the themes of authorship and identity within his work and the art world. Visual response by Ella Kasperowicz, BA(Hons) Illustration.

The Big Draw at Falmouth

Read about last week’s Big Draw project at the Falmouth Campus, on falmouthillustrationblog.com

The week had been meticulously organised by  senior lecturer Linda Scott and involved workshops from MA student Poppy Robinson and Illustration lecturer Nick Mott and a daily reading from Moby Dick by fine art lecturer Gillian Wylde….” (click for more!)

The Big Draw

ELLA-STRATED: Simon Fujiwara at Falmouth

(C) Ella Kasperowicz

(C) Ella Kasperowicz

Second year BA(Hons) Illustration student Ella Kasperowicz provides a visual take on the lecture given by Visiting Professor of Art, Simon Fujiwara, to a packed Falmouth audience on Tuesday 13 October 2015.

Falmouth Illustration at New Blood Graduate Showcase

The D&AD New Blood Graduate Showcase was held this week. BA(Hons) Illustration’s Nigel Owen and Sue Clarke set the show up earlier in the day in what can only be described as tropical conditions. The Falmouth stand was up and looking good just after lunch giving staff and students a chance to have a look at other stands. The overall standard is very good this year with what seems like more illustration on show than in previous years.

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The private view kicked off at 6pm and almost immediately industry clients began to show interest in the work on show by Falmouth students. Well done to all the students that attended for their professionalism.

BA(Hons) Illustration New Designers Exhibition and Private View

New Designers 1

Mark Foreman and Keryn Bibby have done a great job of putting up the New Designers Exhibition, the 2nd of our two graduate showcases in London this year. This is physically a considerably bigger show than the D&AD exhibition and includes the majority of this year’s Falmouth Illustration graduating students. This year the students have done a great job of preparing their boards for the exhibition with the help of Cally back in Falmouth. The final show is a credit to the effort that everyone (staff and students) have put in this year. The Private view kicked off at 6pm and before long there was a healthy number of people gathering around the Falmouth stand. In attendance was Ginny Button, Director of the Falmouth School of Art while industry visitors included Sheri Gee from the Folio Society and Louise Power from Walker Books amongst others. Also paying a visit during the evening was recent Falmouth Illustration alumni Will Grill, who last week was awarded the Kate Greenaway Gold Medal for his book ‘Shackleton’s Journey’, a project that he began while a student at Falmouth. Here are some pictures from the night….

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Falmouth School of Art deliver workshops in China

Nick Mott, BA(Hons) Illustration Lecturer and Lucy Willow, BA(Hons) Fine Art Senior Lecturer, have been in China running workshops for students at CAFA and GAFA. CAFA is the Central Academy of Fine Arts, located in Beijing.  The Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts (GAFA) is the only one of its kind in South China.

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This is a return visit for Lucy, and she has recently said about going back this time: “The relationships are getting stronger and stronger and it’s wonderful to return and have students remember you and the workshops.  The students are also getting a lot from Nick Mott’s drawing games workshops.”

 

Visit from students of the Kyoto University of The Arts

IMG_0494Students from the Kyoto University of the Arts visited Falmouth School of Art with their tutor, Cosei Kawa, an alumni of our BA and MA Illustration courses.  IMG_0510 Cosei studied for his BA(Hons) Illustration at the same time as Nick Mott, who is now a Senior Lecturer on the BA.  Nick and Cosei have kept in contact since their studies.  IMG_0485IMG_0520 The group had a tour of the Falmouth campus, and Nick led a drawing workshop for the students along with several second year Illustration students. The Head of Drawing gave the students a tour of the Drawing studios, and Nigel Owen, Head of Illustration, gave a presentation about the BA Illustration.   After the visit Corei wrote,

“Thank you so much for your welcome, the workshop, and calling your students to join us.”

The Falmouth Illustration Forum: Hidden Agenda

20 March 2015, Falmouth Campus, Falmouth University

hidden-agendaNow in its thirteenth year, this internationally renowned event – organised by Falmouth’s MA Illustration: Authorial Practice – is open to guests nationwide.

This year’s speakers are again high profile practitioners from both illustration and publishing: Dan Fern (Professor Emeritus RCA), Anna Bhushan and Mireille Fauchon (both well-known illustrators), John Vernon Lord (Professor of Illustration at Brighton) and Max Porter (Senior Editor at Granta Books).

French novelist and poet Raymond Queneau, founder of the Ouvroir de Littérature Potentielle (Oulipo) wrote that [Oulipian] authors are ‘rats who build the labyrinth from which they will try to escape.’ Creativity thrives when it is subject to constraint; the Hidden Agenda Forum is interested in the hidden structures that creative people bring to their practice. These may be the straightforward structures of a working day, or more complex mathematical or temporal frameworks used to underpin a large-scale work.

This year’s forum has an underlying literary theme; all the speakers have been involved in the interpretation and production of classic works of literature, including explorations of the formal properties of Haiku, Ted Hughes’ Crow, the poetry of Emily Dickinson, The Bagvad Gita, Anthony Hope’s The Prisoner of Zenda and Finnegan’s Wake.

Existing artworks offer ways into creating new ones; the Hidden Agenda might be the approach taken by the writer or illustrator when interpreting these existing works.

Tickets are available from the University’s online store, priced at £20 for the day-long event, with a special price of £10 for alumni of Falmouth’s MA Illustration: Authorial Practice.

Falmouth Illustration Blog – follow now!

Don’t forget to follow the Falmouth Illustration Blog, this week blogging from the BA(Hons) Illustration trip to London – giving a fascinating insight into the students’ many and diverse industry meetings. Also read about today’s Annual Falmouth / LCC Illustration Forum, speakers including one of the country’s leading reportage artists, Lucinda Rogers, international award winning illustrator Mark Smith and truly innovative animator Cyriak.

Visits to Nobrow and The Artworks

Visits to Nobrow and The Artworks

Falmouth graduate wins ‘New Talent’ AOI Illustration Award

david_doran2014 Falmouth BA(Hons) Illustration graduate David Doran has won the prestigious ‘New Talent’ AOI Illustration Award in partnership with Directory of Illustration. The brief for the award was to create an illustration for an article reviewing Dennis Bock’s novel Going Home Again.

David describes his approach: “It was important to understand the themes and subject matter of the novel being reviewed, but I chose not to look too far beyond the article itself. I simply researched all the visual references in order to pictorially make sense of the text.”

He adds: “Winning the award has been a fantastic experience for me. It’s opened up many new doors and has been an encouraging start to the beginning of my career. It is a huge honour to have been recognised in editorial illustration by such an esteemed panel of judges. I had a lot of fun working on this illustration and am very thankful to Nicholas Blechman, Art Director at The New York Times Book Review, for entrusting me with the project.”

Falmouth Prospectus image cover by David Doran

Falmouth Prospectus cover by David Doran

The AOI Illustration Awards are the most comprehensive and highest profile illustration awards based in the UK, promoting exceptional work by illustrators and presenting illustration as a major force in global visual culture. The awards are international and open to illustrator’s worldwide working across all sectors and in any medium.

Doran has a strong interest in traditional print techniques; his work explores textures and overlapping colour palettes. Often involving a sense of narrative with conceptual elements, he frequently employs figures and symbolism. He has worked with a wide range of international clients, including the New York Times, WIRED, Nobrow and the San Francisco Chronicle.

For more examples of Doran’s work, see his website: daviddoran.co.uk

Also among this year’s New Talent winners were 2012 BA(Hons) Illustration graduate William Grill, and 2014 graduate Katie Ponder.

3rd year Illustration students show portfolios to art directors in New York

Around 50 BA(Hons) Illustration students recently made the long flight to New York to soak up the atmosphere of one of the most exciting cities in the world and to show their portfolios of illustration to art directors from The New Yorker, The Wall Street Journal, BBH, JWT, Bernstein & Andriulli and many more. This annual trip is one of the highlights for the Falmouth course’s final year students, who find the Falmouth name to be very well known at some of the most prestigious agencies and publications in New York.

Head of Illustration, Nigel Owen, kept us up to date with words and plenty of pictures as the week unfolded, via the BA Illustration Blog

Charles Hively reviewing portfolios in Brooklyn

Charles Hively reviewing portfolios in Brooklyn

 

Thursday night at the Standard Beer Garden

Thursday night at the Standard Beer Garden

Falmouth 1st Year Illustration London Study trip

Nine visits have taken place since our last posting. These have included Disney, Egmont, Arena Illustration Agency, ‘Human After All’ (design group), Artit Partners, the Telegraph, Penguin Books, Dorling Kindersley, designer Matt Cooper’s studio, with Phosphor Agency and Walker Books still to come this afternoon.
Yesterday’s Illustration Forum at The London College of Communication was a great success. Catherine Anyango gave a great presentation of her acclaimed Graphic Novel interpretation of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of DarknessIan Whadcock (who had travelled down from Macclesfield especially gave a fascinating insight into his own conceptual processes while Matthew Richardson delighted both Falmouth and LCC students with case studies of recent work. It was a incredibly valuable day. Thanks to all the speakers and also Paul and Stuart at LCC for allowing us to use the college’s facilities for the day.
I think everyone is beginning to flag a little but it has been a fantastic week and a great ending to the autumn term.
Here are some photos with more to come in future posts.

Illustration students visit Artworks and Harper Collins

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Falmouth students visiting Artworks Illustration Agency

A group of BA(Hons) Illustration students have just had a great visit to Artworks Illustration Agency in Hoxton. Lucy and Alex of Artworks, both experienced Illustration agents, discussed a broad range of issues from their perspective. Really informative. Many thanks to Lucy and Alex for taking some time out of their working day.

Eight students have just visited two senior art directors at the literary division of Harper Collins. Designer Julian Humphries hosted what turned out to be an extremely valuable visit. The visit revolved around how illustrators are sourced, the commissioning process, the role of agencies and more. Many thanks to Harper Collins for giving our students the opportunity to visit.

 

A Year of Success for Falmouth’s Illustrators

This has been a really successful year for our third year Illustration students and alumni. As well as some significant commissions that came out of the annual industry visit to New York, a number were successful in some of the major competitions. Notable were four students who were chosen to exhibit in the Serco London Transport Poster exhibition, held at the London Transport Museum. Finn Clark, who graduated in 2012, was the overall winner. His winning poster can been seen at Tube stations all over the underground. Well done to Elena Boils and Oliver Kellett who also were part of the exhibition.

Recent graduate Jim Boswell has been commissioned to produce illustrations for the Folio Society, and had success at D&AD New Blood: Best in Year – D&AD 2012 Illustration – Little White Lies.

Charlotte Trounce, who graduated in 2011 has, with BA(Hons) Illustration Senior Lecturer Linda Scott, recently been commissioned and subsequently published in the Dutch edition of Jamie magazine.

Illustrator Mark Smith recently visited to present his work to all our students. He had been due to speak at our London Illustration Forum, but had to pull out at the last minute, so we are very grateful to him for coming down to Falmouth.

Our third year students will shortly be attending a series of presentations on the subject of Business Skills, as part of our Professional Practice delivery. Themes will include ‘Business Start Up’, ‘Tax Issues’, and ‘Intellectual Property Rights’. Tp compliment this, three successful alumni (Owen Davey, Emma Dibben, Robert Fresson) will talk to students about how they have built their careers; second year students will also hear talks from these alumni, regarding their working practices.

Week of Visiting Lecturers for Falmouth Illustration

BA(Hons) Illustration students have enjoyed a series of Visiting Lecturers, covering themes such as professional practice, editorial illustration, collectives, illustration agencies, life drawing, painting techniques, children’s picture book illustration, and a workshop in digital illustration and web site optimisation.

Successful local artist Tim Clarey worked with second year students, providing specialist advice to students interested in ‘wet media’, painting techniques.

Holly Wales is an established illustrator and academic working in the UK and US; she gave a fantastic presentation of her work to Level 3 students and then held portfolio reviews on the students New York portfolios. Emma Yarlett, a recent graduate of Falmouth who is already making waves in the publishing industry has just had her first illustrated book –  Sydney, Stella & the Moon – published by Templar Books. Her book that formed her presentation, and during her visit she looked at students’ portfolios.

We welcomed back Robert Fresson, another alumni. Fresh from his year at the Royal College of Art, Robert gave a demonstration of traditional Japanese Woodblock printing (Moku Hanga), normally associated with the Ukiyo-e artistic genre. This was a fantastic opportunity for students to witness such a specialist technique at first hand. Robert had spent 3 months in Japan learning this technique from a master print maker as part of his studies at the RCA.

Illustration third years visit New York publishers and agencies

Our final year Illustration students have just returned from a successful and exciting trip to New York. All set had diaries filled with appointments at New York’s top illustration agencies, publishing houses and design groups. Some visits were set up in advance using the contacts that tutors have built up over many years, such as the Illustrators agent Peter Lott at the prestigious Society of Illustrators and the children’s book publisher Holiday House. Students were given a warm and enthusiastic welcome and were offered honest and insightful feedback on their portfolios – important advice for their future careers. Other appointments were set up by the students themselves, including with Pentagram, The New York Times, Penguin and for some lucky students, the legendary designer Milton Glaser. The excitement of experiencing the industry first hand was palpable as the students met up in the evenings to discuss their meetings, and all were left feeling inspired by those who had seen them.

Student Hugh Cowling summed up his experience: ‘I have learnt so much from this week and feel that I really made the most out of it. I had 13 portfolio reviews so I have come back with my head full of advice and suggestions on how to improve my options for when I graduate.’

Falmouth Illustration Lecturers’ publication success

March saw BA(Hons) Illustration Senior Lecturers Natalie Hayes and Mark Foreman both have work published in significant literary and fashion publications.

Level two Course Coordinator Natalie was asked by the celebrated Milliner Stephen Jones to contribute an essay on hand drawn illustration and its position in the digital age for the fashion & style journal called ‘A Magazine Curated By:’ The work of Level Three BA (Hons) Illustration student Patrick Atkins was featured in the article.

Third year Course Coordinator Mark was asked to contribute a number of artworks to the Quarterly ‘Ambit’ literary journal that prints original poetry, short fiction, art and reviews.

Illustration Alumni Visit

Students were recently visited by three of our most successful recent graduates, Emma Dibben, Owen Davey and Robert Fresson, as part of a Business Forum event. The day was a fantastic success, starting with a series of business related lectures and culminating in an afternoon of illuminating talks by by our visiting alumni.

Owen Davey is a freelance Illustrator. Well known for his children’s picture books, he has worked extensively within editorial and advertising too. In 2011, Owen won ‘Junior Magazine Most Promising New Talent Award’ for debut picture book, Foxly’s Feast. His clients include Orange, BBC, Microsoft, Persil, The Guardian, New York Times, The Times, The Telegraph and Jamie Oliver; his work has been published in every continent except Antarctica, including picture books in UK, America, Australia, France & China.

Emma Dibben has become well known for her splatters, fingerprints and splodges – you may recognize her work from a Waitrose Bag for Life! – a visual language she has carefully developed and which is now part of her trademark style. On graduating in 2004, with a First Class BA(Hons) Degree, Emma moved to Bristol. Commissions soon followed and saw her creating images for prestigious clients including Waitrose, The Guardian and the BBC. Whilst food illustration is a core element of Emma’s practice, she Emma also thrives on the challenge of editorial illustration, with commissions from the Guardian, Conde Nast and the Financial Times among others.

Flag enthusiast, artist and illustrator Robert G. Fresson has spent the last few years honing the usage of technical drawing tools and materials. He also has an inclination towards off-white papers, Ukiyo-e from Japan and CMYK colour separation. Humour is an important aspect of his work, and he has been quoted as saying (probably to himself), “while it is difficult for me to be seriously funny, I find I have an aptitude for being funnily serious”. His lifelong dream is to own a cabin in Novascotia, though conversely he currently lives on a boat on the River Avon in Bath. Robert has recently completed his MA at the Royal College of Art.

First Year Illustrators visit London

Our Level One study trip to London is a professional practice visit which enables students to meet some of the world’s top art directors, designers, publishers and agents. This year, visits included Transworld, Walker books, Nobrow, The Big Orange, Artworks agency, Debut Art, Dorling Kindersley and more. The visit included a very successful Illustration Forum day, held by Falmouth University at the London College of Communication (to whom we are very grateful). The forum featured three fantastic speakers: Nick White, Laura Carlin and Graham Rawle.