Visiting Professor Graham Rawle to give inaugural lecture at Falmouth

(c) Graham Rawle, from The Wizard of Oz

Author, artist and designer Graham Rawle will give his inaugural lecture as Falmouth School of Art’s Visiting Professor of Illustration on 22 March 2017.

Internationally admired, Rawle is one of the UK’s most interesting and original visual communicators, known by many for his long running ‘Lost Consonants’ strip, which appeared in the Guardian from 1990. A writer and collage artist whose visual work incorporates illustration, design, photography and installation, Rawle has a strong following for his eagerly-awaited published books, which include The Card (shortlisted for the 2013 Writer’s Guild Award), Graham Rawle’s Wonder Book of Fun and Diary of an Amateur Photographer. His collaged novel Woman’s World, created entirely from fragments of found text clipped from vintage women’s magazines won wide critical acclaim, described by The Times as ‘a work of genius…the most wildly original novel produced in this country in the past decade.’ His reinterpretation of The Wizard of Oz won Book of the Year and Best Illustrated Trade Book at the 2009 British Book Design and Production Awards. Alongside these works, Rawle has produced regular series for The Observer, The Sunday Telegraph Magazine and The Times.

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Graham Rawle. Photo credit: Jenny Lewis

Rawle’s flair and passion for education has been recognised through honorary appointments and awards. As a previous contributor to both Falmouth School of Art’s guest speaker programme and its Illustration Forum he already has a strong interest in Illustration here. Of his appointment in 2016, Rawle said, “It’s a great honour for me to have been made Visiting Professor of Illustration at Falmouth University. I have long admired the School of Art’s commitment to nurturing original and individual thinking in art and design. My own research in sequential design and visual narrative spans across illustration, literature and, more recently, film. I’m interested in how the principles of storytelling, particularly three-act structure, can be employed in the development of design strategies across a wide range of disciplines. I look forward to finding ways of making connections with students, staff and researchers at Falmouth”.

Rawle has established himself as a ground-breaking research-led writer, illustrator and designer, evidenced through the range and depth of key scholarly texts that cite and analyse his work. He teaches on the MA Sequential Design/Illustration and MA Arts and Design by Independent Project courses at Brighton and in 2012 he was awarded an honorary doctorate for Services to Design from Norwich University of the Arts.

Graham Rawle’s lecture at our Falmouth Campus is free, but registration is required, as seats are limited: Click here to register through our Eventbrite page.

Find out more about our BA(Hons) Illustration and MA Illustration: Authorial Practice.

 

Visiting Professor appointments at Falmouth School of Art

Falmouth’s Visiting Professor programme brings international speakers of the highest calibre to the university to share their knowledge, insights and experiences with students, staff and wider public. Visiting Professors are appointed for three years, delivering both public lectures and working with our students during their annual visit. The Falmouth School of Art is delighted to announce new appointments this autumn of the artist Hew Locke as Visiting Professor of Fine Art and illustrator and writer Graham Rawle as Visiting Professor of Illustration.

Hew Locke, 2016, by Charlie Littlewood

Hew Locke, 2016, by Charlie Littlewood

Hew Locke is one of Falmouth’s most celebrated alumni and he’s keen to revive his special connection with the university: ‘I am very much looking forward to taking up this appointment, and to travelling down to Falmouth once again. My time at the School of Art was an important part of my career, and experiences I had there still resonate in my work today.  I hope in (my) turn to be able to make my own positive contribution to students’ development over the next three years.’

Born in Edinburgh, Locke spent his formative years in Georgetown, Guyana, before returning to the UK to study. He received his BA(Hons) Fine Art in 1988 from Falmouth, then an MA in Sculpture from the Royal College of Art, London in 1994. His investigation of the display of power includes royal and swagger portraiture, coats-of-arms, public statuary, trophies, financial documents, weaponry and costume.

The Nameless (2010), Installation view, Hew Locke. Photo courtesy Hales Gallery.

The Nameless (2010), Installation view, Hew Locke. Photo courtesy Hales Gallery.

 

Maritime imagery and symbolism have been ongoing preoccupations in his work, along with reflections on his upbringing in Guyana. Locke has work in numerous collections including Tate, the British Museum, the V&A, Brooklyn Museum and the Perez Art Museum Miami. He has had solo shows in public galleries in the UK and the USA, and has taken part in Biennials in Hangzhou, China; Kochi, India; Prospect3, Miami; Guangzhou, China; Valencia, Spain and San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Locke’s inaugural Professorial Lecture, for which registration is now open, takes place on Wednesday 16 November, 2016.

Graham Rawle. Photo credit: Jenny Lewis

Graham Rawle. Photo credit: Jenny Lewis

Internationally admired, Graham Rawle is one of the UK’s most interesting and original visual communicators, perhaps best known for his long running ‘Lost Consonants’ strip, which first appeared in the Guardian in 1990. His flair and passion for education has also been recognised through honorary appointments and awards. As a previous contributor to both Falmouth School of Art’s guest speaker programme and its Illustration Forum he already has a strong interest in Illustration here.

Of his appointment, Rawle says, “It’s a great honour for me to have been made Visiting Professor of Illustration at Falmouth University. I have long admired the School of Art’s commitment to nurturing original and individual thinking in art and design. My own research in sequential design and visual narrative spans across illustration, literature and, more recently, film. I’m interested in how the principles of storytelling, particularly three-act structure, can be employed in the development of design strategies across a wide range of disciplines. I look forward to finding ways of making connections with students, staff and researchers at Falmouth”.

(C) Graham Rawle, Woman's World, close-up

(C) Graham Rawle, Woman’s World, close-up

Rawle is a writer and collage artist whose visual work incorporates illustration, design, photography and installation. He has produced regular series for The Observer, The Sunday Telegraph Magazine and The Times and among his published books are The Card, The Wonder Book of Fun, Lying Doggo, and Diary of an Amateur Photographer. His collaged novel Woman’s World, created entirely from fragments of found text clipped from vintage women’s magazines won wide critical acclaim, described by The Times as ‘a work of genius…the most wildly original novel produced in this country in the past decade.’ His reinterpretation of The Wizard of Oz won the Best Illustrated Trade Book Award as well as 2009 Book of the Year at the British Book Design Awards. The Card, was shortlisted for the 2013 Writers’ Guild Award for fiction.

Rawle has established himself as a ground-breaking research-led writer, illustrator and designer, evidenced through the range and depth of key scholarly texts that cite and analyse his work. He teaches on the MA Sequential Design/Illustration and MA Arts and Design by Independent Project courses at Brighton and in 2012 he was awarded an honorary doctorate for Services to Design from Norwich University of the Arts. He will give his inaugural Professorial Lecture at Falmouth in March 2017.

Pause Collective – Falmouth Fine Art graduates at Manchester’s Kraak Gallery

Pause Collective is a group of three 2014 graduates of Falmouth’s BA(Hon) Fine Art. They have recently held a group show featuring work by ten 2014 Falmouth Fine Art graduates at Kraak Gallery in Manchester’s Northern Quarter, and we’re pleased to share with you their write-up of the exhibition…

The opening night was a busy and vibrant event, with several other artistic events happening that weekend in the city. Falmouth alumni gathered to support the event, as well as Manchester residents and art students from local colleges. The Kraak Gallery is in the heart of the busy city and the artists were carefully selected to interrupt the speed and activity outside and to create a still and quiet moment. The exhibition felt like something of an unexpected discovery; the gallery is somewhat tucked away, and once people arrived, several commented that they did not want to leave. It was a space of sanctuary amongst all the clamour of the city, inviting the audience into its contemplative silence.

On entering the space, you were immediately met with Ashley Sheekey’s strikingly minimal piece Entrance, Exit, a corridor-like sculpture made up of white ceiling tiles. This piece acted as an entrance to the rest of the exhibition, first leading on to the melancholic landscapes of Ryan Joucla and Helen Carter. The landscapes of both Carter and Joucla are ambiguous and cannot be immediately placed, but rather require the audience’s time and attention to journey through them. Lizzy Barnes exhibited delicate prints embossed with architectural shapes that, at first glance, could have appeared to be blank sheets of paper. Round the other side of the space, were Emily Naish’s animations of a bee struggling against the raging sea, caught in a lighthouse beam.

Rose-Marie Caldecott showed her piece Drafting Illusion; flyaway prints on Japanese paper hold a landscape that disappears amongst abstract marks, all trapped beneath a resin block. This sat between Matthew Cotton’s Automated Drawing series, drawings made up of hundreds of delicate circles to create hazy abstract formations. The final wall showed Emily Cranny, Alexander Heath and Lucia Jones. Cranny showed drawings that make use of brighter collage among the mesh of graphite marks; Jones exhibited iPad constructs, where she has worked into photographs digitally with painterly sensibilities. Heath’s paintings, East of Eden, were inspired by John Steinbeck’s novel, and depict large scale semi-abstract figures in bold colours and shapes, but the pieces still retain a quiet attention to detail, with a focus on the surface of the canvas.

The works all held greater depth than could be perceived at first glance. To really experience the work required a full mental immersion; a quiet escape from the busy world outside. These quiet works, that might sometimes be overlooked, were given an opportunity here to speak and be heard. Entering the space was an escape but at the end of the day, we all had to exit back to the loud and bustling reality of Manchester, but hopefully carrying a piece of that quiet with us.

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Ryan Joucla, ‘Drawing a Presence’, Newlyn Art Gallery

BA(Hons) Fine Art student Ryan Joucla is exhibiting some of his recent work in the exhibition ‘Drawing a Presence’ which opens at Newlyn Art Gallery this week. Ryan is a third year student whose practice includes drawing, film photography, and collage and is concerned with the notion of place and landscape. DSC_0143-compressed

Ryan’s drawings exhibited at Newlyn are taken from a body of work called ‘In Passing Series’.  These drawings display an in-between world, the landscape that we view maybe no more than in-passing depicting the experience of moving between two places. They capture a transition; displaying the in-between place between memory and reality. He uses a personal narrative as an illustration to describe this physical and emotional shift, finding the use of charcoal and erasure to be rewarding process for recall. By considering these nondescript spaces and exploring the aesthetics he questions their banality and his relationship with them, hopefully finding some degree of belonging and identity within my new landscape. 

The exhibition Drawing a Presence at Newlyn Art Gallery (9/5/14 to 12/7/14) asks what is it like to be a young person living in Cornwall, whether born and raised here or just stopping off for a short time? Drawing a Presence is a snapshot of what it’s like to be a certain age, at particular time, in a specific place. It  is a rare opportunity for artists between the age of 15 and 25 to present their work in a public gallery. Curated by Falmouth based Elle Sambrook and Henry Osman, themselves within that age range, this exhibition invites visitors to Newlyn Art Gallery to view Cornwall as seen by a new generation of artists. The focus is often in contrast to the archetypal image of Cornwall, with alternative landscapes and details often overlooked. Drawing a Presence is the pilot of a four year project which invites young people to express what they feel about the county in which they live.

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Graham Rawle – Thursday 17 April 2014

Thursday 17 April 2014  – 17.00 to 18.00 Woodlane Lecture Theatre – The Falmouth School of Art Lectures.

(C) Graham Rawle

Graham Rawle is an author, artist and designer based in London. His weekly Lost Consonants first appeared in the Weekend Guardian in 1990 and ran for fifteen years.

Rawle has produced other regular series for the Observer, the Sunday Telegraph Magazine and The Times. Among his published books are The Wonder Book of Fun, Lying Doggo and Diary of an Amateur Photographer.

His collage novel Woman’s World, created from fragments of found text clipped from women’s magazines, won wide critical acclaim, described by The Times as ‘a work of genius…the most wildly original novel produced in this country in the past decade’.

Rawle’s reinterpretation of The Wizard of Oz won the ‘Best Illustrated Trade Book Award’ as well as 2009 ‘Book of the Year’ at the British Book Design Awards. His latest novel, The Card was published in June 2012.

Rawle has exhibited widely internationally and given lectures about his work at educational institutions, museums, theatres, literary festivals, galleries, conferences, bookstores and cinemas. He teaches on the MA Sequential Design/Illustration at the University of Brighton, and was recently awarded an honorary doctorate from Norwich University College of the Arts.