Former Visiting Professor Deborah Levy shortlisted for Man Booker Prize

Falmouth School of Art is delighted to congratulate Deborah Levy on being shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2016, for her novel Hot Milk (Hamish Hamilton).Deborah Levy photographed at home in north London for the Observer by Sophia Evans.

Levy served as Visiting Professor of Writing in Illustration to Falmouth School of Art between 2012 and 2015, delivering a series of well attended and thought-provoking lectures to students and the public.

Levy works across fiction, performance and visual culture. She trained at Dartington College of Arts, leaving in 1981 to write a number of plays, highly acclaimed for their “intellectual rigour, poetic fantasy and visual imagination”, including Pax, Clam, Heresies for the Royal Shakespeare Company, and Macbeth – False Memories, all published in Levy: Plays 1 (Methuen).

Her novels include the 2012 Man Booker Prize shortlisted, Swimming Home, translated into 14 languages, Beautiful MutantsSwallowing GeographyThe Unloved (all reissued by Penguin), Billy and Girl (Bloomsbury). Her 2012 short story collection Black Vodka was short listed for The Frank O’Connor Award and the BBC International Short Story Award. Her long form essay, ‘Things I Don’t Want to Know’, a response to George Orwell’s 1946 essay ‘Why I Write’ and Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own is published in hard back by Notting Hill Editions, paperback by Penguin.

Bookmakers William Hill have declared Levy 2/1 favourite to win the prize.

2016 Guardian interview with Deborah Levy

The 2016 Man Booker shortlist:

The Sellout by Paul Beatty (Oneworld)

Hot Milk by Deborah Levy (Hamish Hamilton)

His Bloody Project by Graeme Macrae Burnet (Contraband)

Eileen by Ottessa Moshfegh (Vintage)

All That Man Is by David Szalay (Vintage)

Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien (Granta)

More about the shortlist

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FSA Lectures Spring/Summer line-up announced

A great line-up to look forward to from January through to May 2015…Booking available online exactly two weeks before each event, from the FSA Eventbrite page – bookmark it now!

Flyer - FSA Lectures Spring Summer 2015

 

 

A magnificent asparagus, and also a fountain

ImageWednesday evening, April 30th, Deborah Levy, our Visiting Professor of Writing in Illustration delivered a lecture on Gertrude Stein.

A faith in oneself as an individual voice, a determination to engage the world and qualities of energetic curiosity emerged as themes in Levy’s Lecture. These themes were located in Gertrude Stein’s personal journey and involvement in the Parisian Avant Garde of the early 20th century.

The lecture was not driven by a particular historical or theoretical enquiry into the complex life or work of Gertrude Stein, but by a series of illustrative encounters; her challenge to the norms of punctuation, her use of non-linear literary form, her life with Alice B Toklas and conversations with Picasso. Deborah’s lecture adopted a voice which was both poetic and musical, subverting the tone of the lecture into a form which approached that of a song where her readings of Stein’s poetry illuminated a text which encouraged the audience to have faith in creative acts, intellectual rigour and play.

A LIGHT IN THE MOON

A light in the moon the only light is on Sunday. What was the sensible decision. The sensible decision was that notwithstanding many declarations and more music, not even notwithstanding the choice and a torch and a collection, notwithstanding the celebrating hat and a vacation and even more noise than cutting, notwithstanding Europe and Asia and being overbearing, not even notwithstanding an elephant and a strict occasion, not even withstanding more cultivation and some seasoning, not even with drowning and with the ocean being encircling, not even with more likeness and any cloud, not even with terrific sacrifice of pedestrianism and a special resolution, not even more likely to be pleasing. The care with which the rain is wrong and the green is wrong and the white is wrong, the care with which there is a chair and plenty of breathing. The care with which there is incredible justice and likeness, all this makes a magnificent asparagus, and also a fountain.

Gertrude Stein

Deborah Levy returns to Falmouth as Visiting Professor

Wednesday 30 April 2014 17.00 to 18.00 – Woodlane Lecture TheatreDeborah Levy photographed at home in north London for the Observer by Sophia Evans.

Falmouth School of Art Professorial Lecture – Deborah Levy

Deborah Levy is a writer working across fiction, performance and visual culture. She trained at Dartington College of Arts, leaving in 1981 to write a number of plays, highly acclaimed for their “intellectual rigour, poetic fantasy and visual imagination”, including Pax, Clam, Heresies for the Royal Shakespeare Company, and Macbeth – False Memories, all published in Levy: Plays 1 (Methuen).

Deborah has written five novels: the 2012 Man Booker Prize shortlisted, Swimming Home, translated into 14 languages, Beautiful MutantsSwallowing GeographyThe Unloved (all reissued by Penguin), Billy and Girl (Bloomsbury). Her 2012 short story collection Black Vodka was short listed for The Frank O’Connor Award and the BBC International Short Story Award. Her long form essay, ‘Things I Don’t Want to Know’, a response to George Orwell’s 1946 essay ‘Why I Write’ and Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own is published in hard back by Notting Hill Editions, paperback by Penguin.

For BBC Radio 4, Deborah wrote two acclaimed dramatisations of Freud’s most famous case studies, ‘Dora’ and ‘The Wolfman’. Deborah has lectured at The Freud Musuem, Goethe Institute, Serpentine Gallery, Tate Modern, The Henry Moore Foundation, and The Royal Academy School. She was Fellow in Creative Arts at Trinity College, Cambridge from 1989-1991 and AHRB Fellow at The Royal College of Art 2006-9 where she worked with animators and illustrators on a research project titled, ‘The Life of Objects – What Objects Tell Us About Our Secret Lives’. A BBC Radio 3 documentary presented some of this research in a programme titled The Glass Princess.

Deborah will be collaborating with Andrzej Klimowski, Professor of Illustration at the RCA, on a graphic novel for publishers Self Made Hero, working from her short story ‘Star Dust Nation’.

Deborah Levy’s early work is being reissued and has recently been reviewed by Alex Clark in The Guardian.