FOMO – Introducing Falmouth’s first Art Publishing Fair

F O M O – the first ever Falmouth Art Publishing Fair – opens at 4pm on Friday 29 September for a weekend of talks, workshops, screenings, artists’ book works, performances, zines and comics and readings.   

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Organised by Falmouth School of Art’s Senior Lecturers Neil Chapman, Gillian Wylde and Carolyn Shapiro and Associate Lecturer Maria Christoforidou, F O M O will take place at Falmouth Art Gallery and the Library of the Municipal Buildings, The Moor, Falmouth, and brings together Falmouth School of Art staff and students with local participating institutions including: Falmouth Art Gallery, Falmouth Library, Tate St Ives, Stranger Collective, Urbanomic, Atlantic Press, Burning House Books, BLNT Collective, Keiken and Krowji. 

F O M O will include contributions from academic and research colleagues from: Royal  Holloway University, Cambridge University, West Dean College, Aarhus University, Plymouth University, Goldsmiths University of London, Research Center for Material Culture Netherlands and from across Departments at Falmouth University.

Generously supported by Falmouth Art Gallery, the event has grown out of discussion between colleagues across different departments at Falmouth University. From meetings as a Research Forum, finding common ground between their varied interests, the group started to consider joint research and how best to team up for that work. One of the organisers, Neil Chapman, reflects on the development of the event, and what we can look forward to over the weekend…

‘As a research group, we share a commitment to collective work. That’s both a pragmatic interest and a critical position too. Most often, when people work together it’s so that a workload can be shared. But collective work is unpredictable and inefficient too and these are values that might tend to be lost in the current climate. There is a lot of emphasis in the contemporary workplace on individuals’ success and the competition that results can be destructive. Our title for the event – Fear of Missing Out – is on some level an ironic allusion to these issues.

We are all of us, in different ways, committed to discursive work, to the climate of ideas that surrounds ‘making’ in our different disciplines. And that’s a foundation for the publication fair too, reflected in the many talks, screenings, readings and performances scheduled over the weekend. F O M O provides an opportunity for us to invite our colleagues and friends to Cornwall. It’s good for the cultures of creative practice here in Falmouth. F O M O will bring lots of people into contact who might not have met otherwise. We’re excited to imagine the new partnerships and the new work that might result.

The aim has been to inaugurate the kind of event that we would want to go to ourselves, also the kind of event that students would be excited about. Henrietta Boex, Director of Falmouth Art Gallery, has been extremely supportive. We’ve made all kinds of demands on her and she seems never to say no to anything; the Gallery’s Glyn Winchester has also been a great support. The independence of the project is a way of underscoring our own priorities, which are evident in all kinds of ways through the framing of the event: the name, the graphics, the publicity, the choice of which artists, writers and publishers to invite. There are many Art Publishing Fairs in the UK and abroad and we have had an eye on some of those. But in another sense this Fair has been invented from scratch. And for that reason it will work well as a foundation for bigger and more varied research initiatives to come. We’re talking about a future peer-reviewed journal, discursive gatherings – dream dinner date/fantasy football team type things with exciting living people—maybe some dead folk too, ghosts. No zombies. Digital Roland Barthes’ Camera Lucida . . .

It’s particularly good to be working with current students and recent Falmouth University graduates. As part of FOMO, Graham Taylor who studied Fine Art and who graduated in 2015 is curating an exhibition entitled Practically Outside, involving a dozen or more Falmouth alumni. His contribution makes a direct engagement with the FOMO ethos, looking critically at what it means to be an ‘emerging artist’, engaging in the most thoughtful way with different platforms of exhibition and print publication.’

F O M O also includes contributions from writers, artists, poets, publishers, activists, hackers, Falmouth University alumni and musicians both national and international.

F O M O is an inaugural event, bringing a new art research collective into being, which, over forthcoming months will stage events in different forms and at different locations, connecting diverse networks.

https://falmouthartpublishingfair.wordpress.com/

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Jessica Warboys, Falmouth alumna – talk at Falmouth and solo exhibition at Tate St. Ives

Hill of Dreams 2016, Performer Oliver Baggott, Video, High Definition, colour, sound; 11 minutes
© Jessica Warboys and 1857

Jessica Warboys,
Sea Painting, Dunwich, October, 2015
canvas, mineral pigments
Courtesy the artist & Gaudel de Stampa, Paris.

In association with Tate St. Ives, artist Jessica Warboys, who graduated from BA(Hons) Fine Art at Falmouth in 2001, joins us for a talk on 29 March, to mark her first solo show at a UK national gallery, at Tate St. Ives this Spring.

Warboys works across painting, performance, film and sculpture; her work is informed by personal or collective memories – historical, mythical or fictional. In her Sea Paintings, Warboys explores the connection between painting and performance, submerging damp, folded canvas scattered with coloured pigments into the sea, and allowing the movement of the waves to ‘paint’ the canvas.  The show at Tate St. Ives will feature films, sculptures and paintings, including two specially commissioned works:

Sea Painting, Zennor 2015, was made on the Zennor coast near St Ives.

Hill of Dreams 2016, is a new film that draws from Welsh fantasy writer Arthur Machen’s book of the same name, that relives his memories of rural Gwent, where Warboys was born a century later. Hill of Dreams has been commissioned by Tate St Ives, Casa Masaccio, San Giovanni Valdarno, Italy and Kunsthall Stavanger, Norway and will tour to each of these venues throughout 2016−17.

Warboys currently lives and works in Suffolk and Berlin and has enjoyed wide international exhibition success, including solo exhibitions. After graduating from Falmouth she completed a Masters of Fine Art at Slade School of Art in 2004. Her work was recently included in British Art Show 8.

Register Here for Jessica Warboys’ talk on 29 March, 6pm, Lecture Theatre 1, Falmouth Campus. Please note the later than usual start time.

Jessica Warboys at Tate St. Ives runs from 31 March to 3 September 2017.

Falmouth School of Art Guest Speakers announced for spring 2017

The Falmouth School of Art Guest Speaker Programme resumes in February with a series of events featuring acclaimed artists and illustrators…

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Artist Joey Holder starts the season with a talk on 8 February. Working with scientific and technical experts, Holder makes immersive, multi-media installations that explore the limits of the human and how we experience non-human, natural and technological forms. Mixing elements of biology, nanotechnology and natural history against computer programme interfaces, screen savers and measuring devices, she suggests the impermanence and inter-changeability of these apparently contrasting and oppositional worlds: ‘everything is a mutant and a hybrid’. For a recent exhibition – against the backdrop of the emergent field of computational biology and the Google Genomics project – Holder invented ‘Ophiux’, a speculative pharmaceutical company, imagining its use of genetic sequencing equipment and biological machines to collect data from humans and to sample data from other organisms. She explains: ‘It seems as if everything has become a branch of computer science, even our own bodies probed, imaged, modelled and mapped: re-drawn as digital information’.

On 15 February artist Chantal Joffe will be in conversation with Falmouth School of Art’s Director Dr. Ginny Button. Joffe’s figurative paintings usually depict women or girls, from catwalk models, porn actresses and literary heroines to mothers, children and loved ones. Her paintings question expectations of what a feminist art might be, often pointing to how appearances are constructed – whether in a fashion magazine or the family album – and to the choreography of display. Sometimes shown in groups but recently in iconic portraits, her images of women draw loosely on a range of sources such as photographs, magazines and even reflections in the mirror, using distortion to make her subjects seem more real. Her paintings achieve a psychological and emotional force, prompting reflection on ever-changing human relations and the endless complexity of looking.

1 March sees a return to Falmouth of Illustrator, author and Falmouth Honorary Fellow Posy Simmonds. Simmonds’ work includes many books for adults and children, including Literary LifeLulu and the Flying Babies and Fred, the film of which was nominated for an Oscar. Working across a range of formats and contexts, Simmonds is probably best-known for her series of weekly cartoon strips commissioned by the Guardian since 1977. Gemma Bovery, her reworking of Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary into a satirical tale of English expatriates in France appeared first in the Guardian before publication as a graphic novel in 1999. Acclaimed by the critics for its wit and wickedly sharp observation, it was made into a feature film in 2014. Her prize-winning graphic novel Tamara Drewe also became a very successful film, directed by Stephen Frears.

Falmouth School of Art’s new Visiting Professor of Illustration delivers his inaugural lecture on 22 March. Graham Rawle is an internationally admired writer and collage artist whose visual work incorporates illustration, design, photography and installation. He has produced regular series for The Observer, The Sunday Telegraph Magazine and The Times and among his published books are The Card, The Wonder Book of Fun, Lying Doggo, and Diary of an Amateur Photographer. His collaged novel Woman’s World, created entirely from fragments of found text clipped from vintage women’s magazines won wide critical acclaim, described by The Times as ‘a work of genius…the most wildly original novel produced in this country in the past decade.’ He is perhaps best known to some for his long running ‘Lost Consonants’ strip, which first appeared in the Guardian in 1990.

We finish the 2016-17 Guest Speaker Programme with a TateTalk at Falmouth by Fine Art alumna (2001) Jessica Warboys. Warboys works across painting, performance, film and sculpture. Her talk is in association with Tate St. Ives, which in March will present a major solo show of Warboys’ work. The show will feature films, sculptures, large scale paintings, and Sea Paintings commissioned for the show and created along the Cornish coast. In her Sea Paintings, Warboys explores the connection between painting and performance, submerging damp, folded canvas scattered with coloured pigments into the sea, and allowing the movement of the waves to ‘paint’ the canvas.  Her work is informed by personal or collective memories – hystorical, mythical or fictional. Warboys currently lives and works in Suffolk and Berlin and has enjoyed wide international exhibition success, including solo exhibitions. Her work was recently included in British Art Show 8.

Registration is required for these events, and is open now: http://falmouthschoolofart.eventbrite.co.uk

See all Falmouth University events on our website: www.falmouth.ac.uk/events

Falmouth School of Art Lectures – Spring 2016 schedule announced

Following  a vibrant, varied, and well attended autumn season of lectures, from Sam Thorne, Simon Fujiwara, Elly Thomas, Hew Locke, Gavin Turk, Krijn de Koning and Conrad Shawcross, The Falmouth School of Art is pleased to present forthcoming events for spring and summer 2016…

Flash in the Metropolitan 2007, 16mm film still, © Nashashibi/Skaer

Flash in the Metropolitan 2007, 16mm film still, © Nashashibi/Skaer

The series re-starts on 3 February 2016, with Lucy Skaer and Rosalind Nashashibi, who collaborate as Nashashibi/Skaer. The event is a Tate Talk, in association with Tate St. Ives, with whom Nashashibi/Skaer are currently curating an exhibition which will feature a series of collaboratively made short films.

On 10 February Michael Salu will talk about his practice as an award-winning creative director, writer, art editor/critic and occasional artist. Salu is formerly creative director and art editor of Granta Publications.

Graham Gussin continues the series on 17 February; an artist who uses a wide range of media, including texts, drawings, film, video, sound and installation, to explore the perception of time, space and scale as an organic link between the pieces, the viewer and the exhibition space.

Yiadom-Boakye, No Patience for Juju, 2015, Oil on Canvas, 200 x 130 x 3.7cm, 78.7 x 51.2 x 1.5 inches Courtesy: Corvi-Mora, London, and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. 

Yiadom-Boakye, No Patience for Juju, 2015, Oil on Canvas, 200 x 130 x 3.7cm, 78.7 x 51.2 x 1.5 inches
Courtesy: Corvi-Mora, London, and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

 

We welcome artist Lindsay Seers on 2 March, painter Lynette Yiadom-Boakye on 9 March, and filmmaker Ben Rivers on 16 March in association with The Cornwall Workshop and the School of Film and Television at Falmouth. The 2016 series concludes with a lecture on 18 May by Jessica Warboys. Yiadom-Boakye, Rivers and Warboys are all Falmouth alumni, and we look forward to welcoming them back to talk about their work, practice development and successes.

Events are all free, but booking required. Booking for all events is now open, and some tickets for each event are made available to our alumni and members of the public.

To book: http://falmouthschoolofart.eventbrite.com

 

 

The Clubhouse AGM at The Exchange, Penzance 

Clubhouse AGM

01.12.15 – 19.12.15

Field Notes would like to invite you to The Clubhouse AGM, a programme of talks and workshops at The Exchange this December.

Field Notes is a national projects organisation based in Cornwall, founded and run by curators and Falmouth School of Art alumni Cat Bagg and Rosie Thomson-Glover.

Clubhouse 2The Clubhouse AGM is a three week programme of talks, workshops, parties and screenings that bring some of the past 15 years of Cornwall’s artist led activity into conversation. It is also the culmination of The Clubhouse, a three month project instigated to celebrate and introduce a new audience to artist led practice.

The Clubhouse takes the form of a free, open access creative workspace, available between events, with a fantastic selection of resources to browse through, from artist made publications and seminal texts to artefacts and ever changing displays developed by local organisations.

 

SCREENINGS FROM THE CLUBHOUSE  FREE

The Meeting Room at The Exchange, 4 December: 11.00 – 16.00

Artist films, a silent presentation, screenings of talks, discussions and seminars… also the opportunity to bring artist-led ailments to the Field Notes team (eg: statements, proposals, funding bids, budgets, marketing plans…)

THE CLUBHOUSE AGM   FREE

The Exchange Café Bar, 5 December: 18.00 till late

18.00: Pecha Kuchas by artist initiators and organisations active over the past 15 years, including speakers from Back Lane West and Art Surgery through to Keiken and Medium Rare.

19.00: The Wanderers Book Launch. The Wanderers was a programme of one-off events, installations, performances and talks around Falmouth and the surrounding waterways of the Carrick Roads this summer. Copies of the book will be available for £8.

Followed by CAZbar a night of performance, dancing and drinks! This is the first night of an ongoing event created by CAZ that will also take place on 12th and 19th of December.

TALKNIGHT WITH SAM THORNE   FREEClubhouse

The Exchange Café Bar, 9 December: 18.30 – 20.00

Sam Thorne, founder of Open School East and Artistic Director of Tate St Ives, will talk about artist led practice. The bar will be open for what we hope will be an interesting and insightful night.

Booking recommended due to limited spaces: click here for your eventbrite ticket

THE MAKERS MARKET   FREE ENTRY

The Exchange, 12 December: 10.00 – 17.00

The gallery will be full of craftsman and artists; giving you the opportunity to purchase unique wares straight from their makers…including exquisite artist made books

LEGACY WORKSHOPS   ON THE DOOR – £2 marbling or £8 marbling & bookmaking

The Engine Room at The Exchange, 19 December: 13.30 – 17.00

An afternoon of discussion and making, talking about past projects and the things that can be done to ensure they have a life beyond the duration of an event. Artist and lecturer Alice Mahoney will hold a drop-in sketchbook/notebook-making workshop. There will also be marbling on a grand (and not so venetian) scale; testing out DIY marbling materials and techniques. 

Rosalie Schweiker’s silent presentation, created for Kerri Jefferis and Sophie Chapman’s event: Opportunity Makers, Opportunity Takers, will be screened throughout The Clubhouse AGM. Rosalie is a conceptual artist who uses social exchanges to find new functions for art in the everyday. She has recently been working with Spacex to imagine a future art institution.

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Simon Fujiwara, Visiting Professor of Art

The Falmouth School of Art is delighted to welcome back Simon Fujiwara, to present the third and final lecture of his Visiting Professorship.

Hosted by The Falmouth School of Art at Falmouth University, booking is free, but required: simonfujiwarafal.eventbrite.co.uk 

Flyer - Simon Fujiwara