Artists announced for Falmouth Fine Art London 2017

We’re delighted to announce the names of the artists selected by critic and curator Sacha Craddock from our 2017 BA(Hons) Fine Art degree show, to exhibit at this year’s Falmouth Fine Art London.

Yasmin Alaghband | Bronwen Anwyl | Maxwell Bale | Daniel Bethell | Paula Bolton | Kathleen Broad | Joanna Clarkson | Martin Dodridge | Danielle Georgiou | Alexander Goodyear | Robert Ive | Bethany Kelly | Oscar Lyons | Edward May | Jasmine Mills | Zoe Murphy | Beth Pinner | Kristina Rayner | Michaela Riches | Anthony Sims | Isobel Smith | Lillian Thomson

Falmouth Fine Art London will take place at South Kiosk, SE15, curated by artist Jesse Leroy Smith.

Falmouth Fine Art London 2016

Critic and curator Sacha Craddock selected from Falmouth’s BA(Hons) Fine Art degree shows 20 artists to exhibit at Falmouth Fine Art London 2016 at Underdog Art Gallery, 1 – 3rd July 2016

Max Aspin Radford | Jamie Battersby | Ed Burkes | Ella Caie | Ed Carter | Finbar Conran | Michael Cox | Rob Davis | Joe Fenwick-Wilson | Kerry Foster | Freya Goodwin | Amy Jefferies | Zoë Pearce | Calum Rees-Gildea | Jess Russell | George Stone | Amelia Tinton | Tabitha Tohill Reid | Matthew Vaughan | Sandi Williams | Mara Zaice

The London show case exhibition, now in its fourth year, was a great success. The gallery was set in a vibrant part of the city, within walking distance of Tate Modern, Borough Market and White Cube in Bermondsey. It drew new audiences through a wide range of passers-by.

The work selected sat in a rather Gothic setting under an old railway arch, with dripping painted grey walls and a range of large sofas and chairs. This didn’t detract from the artwork, but provided a new narrative for the work to respond to. George Stone and Tabitha Tohill Reid’s work sat in a large bathroom area adjacent to the main exhibition room breathing life into an uncomfortable space. The artwork selected had a powerful presence in the space.

Artist Graham Gussin met the selected artists in the gallery space to lead a group critique. This was a valuable experience, enabling our recent graduates to participate in a challenging discussion about their work. The short but focused opportunity that the London showcase provides has been met with enthusiasm by all involved, including the staff team who thoroughly enjoy spending time in settings such as this with our most recent completing cohort of fine artists.

Falmouth Fine Art London – artists announced

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We’re delighted to share the names of the final year BA(Hons) Fine Art students selected to exhibit at Falmouth Fine Art London, this year taking place at Underdog Art Gallery from 1-3 July.

Max Aspin Radford | Jamie Battersby | Ed Burkes | Ella Caie | Ed Carter | Finbar Conran | Michael Cox | Rob Davis | Joe Fenwick-Wilson | Kerry Foster | Freya Goodwin | Amy Jefferies | Zoë Pearce | Calum Rees-Gildea | Jess Russell | George Stone | Amelia Tinton | Tabitha Tohill Reid | Matthew Vaughan | Sandi Williams | Mara Zaice

Falmouth Fine Art London promises to be a diverse celebration of Fine Art at Falmouth, and will be curated by artist and Falmouth Associate Lecturer Jesse Leroy Smith. Exhibitors were selected from the recent degree shows by critic and curator Sacha Craddock. The event, now in its fourth year, gives those artists selected an additional professional practice experience as they complete their studies at Falmouth, and gives contacts based in London and the surrounding the opportunity to view our students’ work outside of Falmouth.

A private view of the exhibition will take place 7-9:30 on 30 June, with an alumni happy hour from 6-7pm the same night. Exhibitors will also benefit from an in situ crit with artist Graham Gussin.

Falmouth Fine Art London 2016

We’re making preparations for our fourth London showcase of selected BA(Hons) Fine Art student work, which we are delighted to announce will take place at Underdog Art Gallery from 1-3 July 2016.

Exhibiting students will be selected from the BA(Hons) Fine Art degree shows, which students are currently preparing, by critic and curator Sacha Craddock. The show will be curated by artist and Falmouth Associate Lecturer Jesse Leroy Smith. We’ll share the list of selected exhibitors soon after 31 May.

A private view of the exhibition will take place 7-9:30 on 30 June, with an alumni happy hour from 6-7pm the same night. We’re again looking forward to former students connecting with current students and comparing notes on life after Falmouth Fine Art!

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Artists announced for Falmouth Fine Art London 2015

Critic and Curator Sacha Craddock has selected from Falmouth’s BA(Hons) Fine Art degree shows the artists who will exhibit at Falmouth Fine Art London 2015 at the Embassy Tea Gallery, London.

We’re pleased to congratulate the following, and we look forward to sharing some of their work with you from 3-5 July, in an exhibition curated by artist Jesse Leroy Smith:

Elin Barker | Maisie Blackburn Scott | Yasmin Brain | Beccy Bray | Mair Cook | Alice Ellis Bray | Rebecca Eley | Janne Erlandsen | Sean Fergus | Ross Gamble | Jessie Giudici Mumford | Katherine Glynne Jones | Joanna Hulin | Salli Louise Johnson | Lauren Kent | Nicola Kerslake | Aimee Labourne | Adam Langer | Sophie Malpas | Hana Omori | Paul Pilgrim | Nick Popham | Darren Ray | Camilla Robinson | Andy Ross | Freddie Strickland | Jacob Theobald | Anna Karin Waara | Gareth Wilde.Falmouth Fine Art London eflyer

 

As part of Falmouth Fine Art London, we will welcome alumni of BA(Hons) Fine Art, for an Alumni Happy Hour; and exhibiting artists will benefit from an in situ crit with artist and former Falmouth Visiting Professor of Fine Art, Cornelia Parker.

 

 

Save the date – Falmouth Fine Art London 2015

We’re excited to confirm the venue for this, the third Falmouth Fine Art London, as The Embassy Tea Gallery, London SE1 0LN.

Falmouth School of Art at Falmouth University will present a showcase of work selected from the BA(Hons) Fine Art degree show by art critic and curator Sacha Craddock and curated by artist Jesse Leroy Smith.

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Students are currently preparing their degree shows, with selection for Falmouth Fine Art London taking place on 3 June. Artists selected for this exhibition will also benefit from a critique of their work in situ by Falmouth School of Art’s Visiting Professor of Fine Art, Cornelia Parker. We look forward to gathering Fine Art alumni for a Happy Hour on 2 July, the night of the Private View, and all being well some familiar faces from among former course staff.

Fine Art at Falmouth has a long and distinguished reputation for excellence and continues to help students meet the challenges and opportunities of the contemporary art world and the fast growing creative industries.  BA(Hons) Fine Art offers its students an exceptional environment for thinking and making, fostering experimentation and critical dialogue. Exhibitions and other professional skills development opportunities are supported during the course, and many alumni have enjoyed success and critical acclaim, including celebrated artists Tacita Dean, Hew Locke, Tim Shaw, Ben Rivers, Lynette Yiadom Boakye and Jessica Warboys.

Opening times:

  • Friday 3 July: 10:30 – 6:30pm
  • Saturday 4 July: 10:30 – 6:30pm
  • Sunday 5 July: 10:30 – 2pm

Private View – Thursday 2 July 7-9pm

Alumni Happy Hour – Thursday 2 July 6-7pm

Falmouth School of Art celebrates its Turner Prize 2013 nominee

Around 120 Fine Art students and staff gathered for a panel discussion about the Turner Prize, followed by the live televised broadcast of the announcement of the 2013 winner. Among the four nominees this year was Falmouth Alumna Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, who graduated from Falmouth’s BA(Hons) Fine Art with first class honours in 2000.

Students and staff filled the refectory

Director of the Falmouth School of Art, Dr. Ginny Button, who curated the Turner Prize from 1993-1998, and authored The Turner Prize: Twenty Years, led the discussion, with panel members critic, writer and former Turner Prize juror Sacha Craddock, and 2013 Threadneedle Prize winner and Senior Lecturer at Falmouth University, Lisa Wright.

The panel started by considering the value of art competitions generally, and noted that the Turner Prize is particular in that it is based on closed selection, rather than open submission. This led to reflection on the move, among open competitions, toward digital submission. In 2014, the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, which has always invited physical work, will for the first time shortlist all categories from initial digital submission, anticipating this process being easier for entrants. Wright, winner of the 2013 Threadneedle Prize, an open competition for figurative and representational painting and sculpture, suggested that entering certain work digitally can be problematic due to the loss of the sense of scale, surface and presentation. The panel encouraged students, however, to enter open competitions: Craddock recalled having offered Falmouth alumnus Ben Rivers a show when his work caught her eye whilst she was judging competition submissions.  Rivers has gone on to win numerous awards and prizes and exhibit internationally, and last month returned to give a guest lecture at Falmouth.

Turning their attention to the role and operation of juries, the panel considered the experience of judging an art prize. Button asked, ‘What is it like in that room?’ In Wright’s experience of fellow judges, ‘the work you think a judge will select will be nothing like the work they select’. For Craddock, the role leaves jurors vulnerable, the process of evaluation also being revealing about those doing the evaluating. That process of evaluation and critique, the panel pointed out, was one that this audience was already well-versed in, from reflecting on their own work and that of their peers throughout their studies.

Button’s experience assisting juries as curator of Turner Prize revealed to her the extent to which all four shortlisted artists have had to resonate with all the jurors in order to make the shortlist. At this point, Button suggests, all four are winners – from the shortlist, the prize really could go in any of four directions. But the make-up of the jury can, she observed, give an indication of which artists may appear on the shortlist, reflecting the particular interests of the jurors.

The Turner Prize is awarded for an outstanding exhibition or other presentation of work in the 12 months preceding nomination; however, it is the later Turner Prize exhibition which draws the wider public and has tended to capture the media’s imagination. Craddock recalled how in 1999 – when she and her fellow jurors awarded the prize to Steve McQueen – media and public attention focused on Tracey Emin’s Turner Prize exhibition, My Bed, with then Culture Secretary Chris Smith accusing the jury of ‘controversy for controversy’s sake’. In fact, Emin had been nominated for earlier 1998-99 works, including film and, as Tate announced, ‘for her exhibitions in New York and Japan in which she continued to show her versatility across a wide range of media, her vibrancy and flair for self-expression’.

The panel deftly avoided revealing to the audience which artist any of them was rooting for from the 2013 shortlist – ‘You’re not supposed to ask that!’ – but they were happy to share their admiration for Yiadom-Boakye. Wright described her as ‘very true to herself’, and Craddock, who taught Yiadom-Boakye at the Royal Academy Schools, reflected on her ‘amazing ability’, and noted the mysterious quality of her paintings. Yiadom-Boakye, who describes her nomination as ‘a very big surprise’, is the second Falmouth alumna to be nominated for the Turner Prize: Tacita Dean was nominated in 1998.

As attention turned to Channel 4’s televised lead-up to the announcement of the 2013 winner, the Falmouth crowd heard Scissor Sisters’ Ana Matronic, the daughter of a painter, enthuse about Yiadom-Boakye’s work: ‘I love, love, loved it’. 

And finally, the live announcement, from Derry-Londonderry, of the 2013 winner…Congratulations to Laure Prouvost!

Congratulations, too, to Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, Tino Sehgal and David Shrigley, who, as Ginny Button pointed out, are all winners by virtue of making the shortlist and – as Shrigley observed – ‘get paid £5000 anyway…that can’t be bad!’.